Archives for category: Sculpture

Alicja Kwade

“Kwade changes and manipulates the physical properties of materials, thereby evoking the surprise effects which disconcert the value we place on experience, our attitudes and our viewing habits.
The transformation of the simplest everyday objects by way of an elaborate procedure into apparently luxurious artifacts shows our understanding of materials, objects and ideas.
Our ascriptions and perceptions, frequently irrational, are based on cultural patterns, conventions and codes which Kwade undertakes to question with her ‘counteractions’. “What interests me are those things and phenomena about which one is not in a position to comprehend […] these concern the abstract, the absurd, the inexplicable and the not-experienceable, but the nevertheless constantly present […]”. (Alicja Kwade)” Isabel Meixner

“With the materials she uses, the found pieces and design objects, she also draws on the wealth of forms and ideas of art history: she touches the cosmos of a Marcel Duchamp with his idea of the Readymade. Merging objects and the cancellation of physical attributes are reminiscent of Salvador Dalí and René Magritte. But when viewing Alicja Kwade’s clear and minimalist sculptures one may also observe an affinity to Donald Judd and Robert Morris. For this process-oriented further development, Kwade counteracts the aspects of the museal and of conservation, here addressing a fundamental question in the contemporary art world and institutions” Isabel Meixner

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Ben Butler

“Butler takes notions of organic growth and its natural laws seriously, though for all the (for want of a less ponderous word) philosophical background he might bring to his task, his work embodies a truly lovely and delicate lightness of being that’s both profound and irresistible”   Fredric Koeppel

 

Peter Land

“peter land was born in 1966 in aarhus, denmark. The artist lives and works in copenhagen, he studied at the royal danish academy of fine arts in copenhagen and at goldsmiths college in london. He is primarily known for his video installations, which are simultaneously tragic and comic. Peter land is especially interested in people’s constant attempts (which often fail) to appear competent, relaxed and convincing in socially predetermined roles.” Statement

Gerry Judah

“Gerry Judah’s paintings are a direct response to conflict across the globe, and the impact of that violence, whether it is the consequence of war or natural disaster. At the same time, he is fascinated by changing urban landscape, and his paintings explore the dynamic of construction and destruction. It is hard to look at his work without reflecting on conflict in the Middle East whether that be Afghanistan, Iraq or recent months in Gaza. There are also echoes of the devastation ensuing from climate change wrought by hurricanes, tsunamis, flooding and bushfires that remind us of New Orleans underwater, or the aftermath of the tsunami in the Asian Basin. Although on first inspection, Judah’s epic landscapes articulate global concerns for peace, he acknowledges the dangers of man’s impact on a finely balanced global ecology, and the decimation that unravels as we exploit the planet with an ever growing appetite.” Jenny Blyth, 2009

Maria Jose Arjona

“Her body of work is divided in two: Single pieces (site specific) and performance cycles which operate in synchronicity within the chronological timeline. The performance cycles, composed by a series of works, are created by the artist as “research spaces” in order to understand the meaning of specific concepts and their effects on the body. Both, concepts and effects, within the frame of an almost scientific method, unfold into different dynamics where the presence of the artist must function outside the boundaries of identity. Arjona’s work does not respond or denounces specific events; the performances their selves, are transformed into questions or bridges uniting distant points of diverse conversations. The artist’s objective then, is to become a connecting entity, operating as medium of visual communication and energy exchange.”

Watch Video in this link: Interaction 1.

Bernardi Roig

“Roig is obsessed with death and immortality, aesthetics and eroticism, and the “idée fixe” that the thinking man must reclaim his forfeited ability to relate to others on an intimate level. He realizes that to truly communicate, we need a dialogue of more than the spoken word. Roig speaks to the viewer through his solitary man by forcing us to confront our desires, the human concepts of progress, and social change – all of which remain unfulfilled. With these elusive, undefined objectives the Artist invites a dialogue on the multiple identities of the contemporary man, seen in the light of art and philosophy. It is this, the Artist’s realm of unwritten poetry, which lingers in our mind’s eye long after the works are out of view. For Roig, desire is the only thing that keeps death at arm’s length. It is this tangible proof that we are here, struggling to achieve higher consciousness that defies the vacuum of meaning that exists in a large part of present day art” Claire Oliver Gallery

 

 

 

Claire Morgan

“My work is about our relationship with the rest of nature, explored through notions of change, the passing of time, and the transience of everything around us. For me, creating seemingly solid structures or forms from thousands of individually suspended elements has a direct relation with my experience of these forces. There is a sense of fragility and a lack of solidity that carries through all the sculptures. I feel as if they are somewhere between movement and stillness, and thus in possession of a certain energy…”

The titles of the works are very important, and often make reference to historical or contemporary popular culture, words being appropriated from the titles of films or books, or phrases being manipulated through combination with the artwork. These connections often add a comedic element to the works, a sense of irony or bluntness that keeps them firmly rooted in my experience of the world that we humans inhabit. Though the phrases have a specific history, the jarring between the title and the form can bring a desirable ambiguity through intentionally creating confusion…”

Valerie Hegarty

“For Valerie Hegarty, the joy of her work lies in its destruction rather than its making. Centring her practice on the politics of the American myth, Hegarty’s canvases and sculptures replicate emblems of frontier ethos – colonial furniture, antique dishware, and heroic paintings of landscapes and national figures only to demolish them by devices associated with their historical significance” Saatchi Profile

Peter Callesen

“The paper cut sculptures explore the probable and magical transformation of the flat sheet of paper into figures that expand into the space surrounding them. The negative and absent 2 dimensional space left by the cut, points out the contrast to the 3 dimensional reality it creates, even though the figures still stick to their origin without the possibility of escaping. In that sense there is also an aspect of something tragic in many of the cuts.”A. Statement

“It is probably the most common and consumed media used for carrying information today. This is why we rarely notice the actual materiality of the A4 paper”

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