Archives for category: Magazine

Christophe von Hohenberg

“Throughout his productive career photographing celebrities, he has worked with magazines including American Vogue, Interview, Vanity Fair, Marie Claire, German Vogue, German Rolling Stone, New York Times Magazine, French Vogue, Hampton’s Magazine, and others. Von Hohenberg has established his place in the art world, as a portrait photographer, with his unique gift for capturing the inner essence of individuals in distinguished and elegant ways. His portraits have been displayed at The Grey Art Gallery in New York, Art and Interior in Berlin and Valentina Moncada in Rome. In addition, Von Hohenberg is actively engaged in shooting advertising campaigns for major companies” Nuartlink Gallery

 

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Victor van Gaasbeek

“The Sliced Pixel technique originated from some experiments in Adobe Illustrator mid 2009. This project is all about simplicity, only including what’s absolutly necessary, yet preserving as much detail as possible.”

“With this technique I used the most basic elements in todays graphic design; the pixel. The pixels were sliced in half, and with the sliced pixels I created numerous animal heads. Up-close all you see is triangles, but when you look from a distance, the big picture becomes clear”

“The Sliced Pixel Technique isn’t a ‘one-button’ effect, although there’s some software available that tries to mimic the effect, the original Sliced Pixel images are made in (Adobe) Illustrator using a grid. Every triangle has been colored one by one”

Bill Sullivan

“I was tired of the conventions in which most photographs of people are taken. And I was tired of the results that  often seem to pass for poetry. I needed something to be objective : I wanted the context to be clearly established . I  wanted play a role in the situation, but I wanted the situation to take a photograph of itself for me . I would design the scenarios in which this could happen, and then the situation could be responsible for creating the picture. The poetry would be as much in the design of that scenario as from any photograph that might come from it. These situations would include me but I would disappear as any kind of typical photographer. I would simply play a role in the  scenario. I would become someone waiting for an elevator, a man reading the New Yorker waiting for a friend to pass through the turnstile, or simply another tourist watching someone having his or her portrait done. The situations were mapped out, tests were made, and special clothing was worn. I became a spy for the obvious”

Maria Jose Arjona

“Her body of work is divided in two: Single pieces (site specific) and performance cycles which operate in synchronicity within the chronological timeline. The performance cycles, composed by a series of works, are created by the artist as “research spaces” in order to understand the meaning of specific concepts and their effects on the body. Both, concepts and effects, within the frame of an almost scientific method, unfold into different dynamics where the presence of the artist must function outside the boundaries of identity. Arjona’s work does not respond or denounces specific events; the performances their selves, are transformed into questions or bridges uniting distant points of diverse conversations. The artist’s objective then, is to become a connecting entity, operating as medium of visual communication and energy exchange.”

Watch Video in this link: Interaction 1.

Kumi Yamashita

“I sculpt shadow with light or sometimes light with shadow, but both function in essentially the same manner. I take objects and carve and place them in relation to a single light source. The complete artwork is therefore comprised of both the material (the solid objects) and the immaterial (the light or shadow)”

Henrik Aarrestad Uldalen

“is a self-taught artist whose creative production revolves around classic figurative painting, presented in a contemporary manner. The atmosphere in his subject matter is often depict in a limbo or dream-like state. Despite his realistic approach, photographic accuracy is not what he seeks to achieve”

Claire Morgan

“My work is about our relationship with the rest of nature, explored through notions of change, the passing of time, and the transience of everything around us. For me, creating seemingly solid structures or forms from thousands of individually suspended elements has a direct relation with my experience of these forces. There is a sense of fragility and a lack of solidity that carries through all the sculptures. I feel as if they are somewhere between movement and stillness, and thus in possession of a certain energy…”

The titles of the works are very important, and often make reference to historical or contemporary popular culture, words being appropriated from the titles of films or books, or phrases being manipulated through combination with the artwork. These connections often add a comedic element to the works, a sense of irony or bluntness that keeps them firmly rooted in my experience of the world that we humans inhabit. Though the phrases have a specific history, the jarring between the title and the form can bring a desirable ambiguity through intentionally creating confusion…”

Valerie Hegarty

“For Valerie Hegarty, the joy of her work lies in its destruction rather than its making. Centring her practice on the politics of the American myth, Hegarty’s canvases and sculptures replicate emblems of frontier ethos – colonial furniture, antique dishware, and heroic paintings of landscapes and national figures only to demolish them by devices associated with their historical significance” Saatchi Profile

Claire Atkinson

“Quite often, street photography pays attention to extraordinary occurrences within a city. In contrast to the unusual and sometimes fantastical, Claire Atkinson manages to capture the more realistic, everyday perspective of the daily life of Manchester.

Atkinson’s ever-changing ‘Manc’ characters and backdrops show Manchester for its true self. The delightful personalities to be found on public transport, the caffeine-addicts through steamy café windows and the rushing feet of business along rainy pavements. We are not only given a taste of Manchester, but a rushing, blurry, reflection of Britain as a grumpy, ageing, multicultural nation.” Article Magazine, 2011

 

Derek Albeck

“These days I spend a lot of time taking photos of the people and places I surround myself with. I sort through lots of photos, mostly mine, sometimes borrowed from friends, and on certain occasions I will appropriate an image that I find fitting for a drawing, I generally pick out the ones that I find funny, unflattering or satirical and have a good story behind them and work from there. I edit and compose the photos digitally and then transfer my composition to its surface which is usually paper” D. A.

 

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